Hyperspace

Galactic Frontier > Hyperspace


The way that hyperspace works in this mashup is unique to the setting, and not drawn from either Star Trek nor Star Wars. The reason for this is less to reconcile the way faster-than-light (FTL) travel occurs in the parent settings, and more to provide a way that some systems (such as Earth) can be completely cut off from the rest of the galaxy long enough for the isolation to be a significant factor.

A hyperspace point, or hyperpoint, is a natural region of space-time where, for lack of a better analogy, reality becomes “thin” due to pressing up against another region of space-time. These points are usually locked in apparent “orbit” around large gravitational sources. These are usually stars, but a black hole can form (or collect from cannibalized stars) many hyperspace points. The Maw, a black hole cluster, holds the largest known number of hyperspace points; but it can be extremely dangerous to traverse due to both the natural dangers and the many pirates who lurk there and use the numerous hyperpoints to quickly make an escape.

Finding a hyperspace point can be tricky. Sometimes they are obvious, being points that naturally attract errant matter to be sucked into hyperspace. Other times they have to be discovered by observing minute fluctuations in gravity within a solar system. Rarely, one is discovered by a ship happening to cross close enough that the effect is noticeable, assuming the ship is equipped with the right instruments. Due to the distance that a hyperpoint is normally found at relative to other large bodies, and the delicate instrumentation necessary to notice them, serendipitous discoveries normally only happen when a hyperpoint fluctuates.

Each hyperpoint resonates in a certain manner consistent with the with the hyperspace pocket it opens into. Whether these “pockets” are actually micro-universes or all connected somehow is a matter for debate; what is known is that no pocket ever forms without being connected to at least two points in normal space. Traversing a pocket gives an apparent FTL speed, allowing a starship to travel from one star to another in far less time than it would take in normal space. However, since a single pocket can connect anywhere in the galaxy (no pocket has ever been known to lead to another galaxy), real-space maps are only used by dedicated astronomers. Neighboring star systems along hyperspace trade routes may actually be on opposite ends of the galactic plane.

Crossing a hyperspace pocket is generally an easy task, but the “edges” of a pocket are more turbulent. The path in and out of a pocket is often too complex and changing for even a sophisticated AI; the best pilots are usually Force-sensitives, and a trained Force-using pilot can command high prices in both civilian and military organizations. Some hyperpoints are so complex that only small ships piloted by powerful force-users can cross them; others are calmer, and can allow large freighters and even AI drones to pass.

Once actually in a hyperspace pocket, a ship can often encounter powerful ion storms and other energy fields, which can gather at some hyperpoints and prevent even shielded ships from crossing until they dissipate. To avoid storms, a starship may need to go into the “center” of a pocket, but this risks losing a navigation fix on where the ship came through, much less where it is going, thanks to shifting gravity waves in the center of a hyperspace pocket. Most ships plot a close course along the “edge” of a pocket, where gravity currents are more steady and more easily mapped.


Galactic Frontier > Hyperspace

Hyperspace

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